“Why not?” Exploring sex & gender history through N.O. Body’s memoirs”

Dr Ina Linge is Lecturer in German at the University of Exeter, where she is also Co-director of the interdisciplinary Sexual Knowledge Unit. I started out as a new Lecturer in German in June 2020, in the middle of the pandemic. It has certainly been a challenging and exhausting time to develop new modules and … Continue reading “Why not?” Exploring sex & gender history through N.O. Body’s memoirs”

Remaking the German Studies Curriculum: A Diversifying Approach

We are excited to publish a post from Domenic DeSocio, who is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Michigan. He is currently completing a dissertation on the intersection of temporality and queer and female sexualities in German-language modernist literature. He has recently received funding to set up … Continue reading Remaking the German Studies Curriculum: A Diversifying Approach

Is this the first poem written by a Black German writer?

Dr Nicola Thomas is Lecturer in German at the University of Bristol. Here, she talks about stumbling across a lesser-known landmark in Black German history.  I’ve just started a new job at the University of Bristol, and I was asked to update the first-year poetry reader over the summer. Over the years, colleagues at Bristol (past … Continue reading Is this the first poem written by a Black German writer?

Race and Revolution in German Literature around 1800

Joanna Raisbeck is a Stipendiary Lecturer in German at Wadham College and The Queen's College, University of Oxford, with research interests in German Romanticism and the so-called 'Sattelzeit'. The question of race in German literature before the late twentieth century is in general overlooked on undergraduate syllabuses. There are excellent resources that help readers explore … Continue reading Race and Revolution in German Literature around 1800

Modern Theories, Medieval Worlds: Teaching Gender and Identity in Medieval Literary Studies

In this month’s blogpost, Aysha Strachan, a PhD candidate at KCL/HU Berlin, suggests that teaching modern theory alongside medieval literature gives us better access to the challenges that these texts issue to modern norms and assumptions. As a new Graduate Teaching Assistant teaching second-year seminars on Gender and Identity in German Arthurian literature, I was … Continue reading Modern Theories, Medieval Worlds: Teaching Gender and Identity in Medieval Literary Studies

Should we teach Handke? Canon, curriculum and the Nobel Prize.

The awarding of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Literature to Austrian Peter Handke has been highly controversial. Here, Helen Finch (University of Leeds) considers the implications this has for Germanists and our responsibility to respond.  ‘Should I read Handke, then?’ a student of German at Leeds asked me yesterday. I stuttered, stopped, hedged. Normally, I … Continue reading Should we teach Handke? Canon, curriculum and the Nobel Prize.